Employee Training

How to Evaluate Training Effectiveness (with the Right Metrics)

Let’s start by why you need to measure training: to make sure you’re using the best training methods and tools available, in the best way possible that is best fitted for your users. Or, in other words – to ensure you’re getting results.

 

Consequently, the only way to measure some training methods is after the fact, by checking performance and product adoption rates. This applies to training methods that are detached from actual work in the product – frontal training in class, webinars and video training. There is simply no way of checking if the training was effective before users start applying what they’ve learned to hands-on work in the product.

 

In-app online training, however, can be measured and tested live. If you combine live metrics with performance metrics, you get the ultimate training effectiveness measurement that tells you what you need to know about your training plan.

 

soccer players laid back stock evaluating training effectiveness

Read More

Boost Online Sales Training with this Neat Piano Lesson Trick

My friend Jonathan is a piano teacher. He teaches youngsters and school students, teens and adults.

 

Over the years, Jonathan learned to identify patterns in his students’ interest in lessons: it turns out –probably not very surprisingly– that when students are enthusiastic about a certain piece or genre they practice intensively and are very eager and attentive at lessons.

 

However, when they are required to practice scales, boredom, restlessness and mediocrity immediately take over (more so for the youngsters than the adults, for obvious reasons).

 

But what can you do? Scales are an integral part of developing musical listening and solidifying habits and skills.

 

Read More

5 Ghosts of Old Training Mistakes that Will Come Back to Haunt you

Halloween is a wonderful opportunity to air old skeletons in our closet and confront our greatest professional fears, which we normally keep well hidden and tucked away during the year. Training strategy is something we work really hard on all year round, but we only get a chance to address it with a spooky, tongue-in-cheek tone once a year, so of course I couldn’t resist.

Memo, The Goldfish Ghost of the Forgetting Curve

The Forgetting Curve is gaining more awareness in the training sphere. According to scientist Herman Ebbinghaus, most learners lose over 40% of what they’ve learned within the first 20 minutes. By the 6th day, most of lose 80%-90% of what we’ve learned. Not unlike a goldfish. Mind-boggling.

 

Training professionals and CLOs are becoming increasingly aware of this painful side effect of the training process, and are looking for new methods and technologies to beat this plague. Needless to say, users who were trained ineffectively usually turn to customer support when they run into functionalities they don’t recognize. This results in massive need for support, where training should have addressed the issue in the first place.

iridize_forgot-the-forgetting-curve

Read More

Facing the Forgetting Curve

How much did your organization spend on employee training and onboarding in 2015? If your organization is like most organizations today, the answer is probably – large sums of money. But let’s be honest, despite offering new employees days’ worth of classroom (or virtual classroom) training packed into a 4-6 day period, hoping they are made “ready” for their post, the result isn’t all that… productive. To say the truth, about 80%-90% of what is presented to new employees during these first, few days is lost – forgotten – within, well, days. This disturbing statistic is a part of a known problem in the learning and training industry called the Forgetting Curve

 

forgetting curve graphSource

 

Read More

LavaCon Dublin 2016 – Here We Come!

lavacon

 

Coming to LavaCon Dublin 2016? We’ll be there! We’re really excited about sponsoring the leading conference for technical communicators, coming to Europe. Come visit us at booth 32 and learn more about microlearning and supportive training technologies.

 

Fancy a Discount?

If you haven’t registered yet, use IRIDIZE referral code and get a 55EUR discount.

 

Seen the Program Yet?

Of course you have.  We recommend you pencil in Industry Leader’s Panel – If I Had Known Then What I Know Now, on June 8th, 9:30. Iridize’s own CMO, Oded Ilan, will be participating alongside MadCap’s Mike Hamilton and Astoria’s Michael Rosinski. You can also read more.

 

See you at #LavaCon!

 

 

Onboarding Millennials: From Instructive to Supportive Employee Training

The full version of this article was originally published on on Bob’s Guide. 

Quietly and almost unnoticeably, employee training practices which had been in use for decades are becoming obsolete. While existing practices may still be relevant to some employees, for a growing percentage of our workforce: the millennials, these have become less relevant and even a hindrance. By 2014, 36% of the workforce was comprised of millennials. This means that over a third of your workforce grew up in a world where instant communication and accessible, affordable technology were a given, a thing to be taken for granted.

 

When it comes to work-culture – millennials are different. Being constantly connected and used to immediate feedback, they bring a quick and vibrant rhythm to professional environments. They are digitally native, often preferring to communicate via Hangouts, chats and instant messaging over emails or phones. Chats are actually a good example of the Millennial pace: short, laconic, and efficient – i.e., bite-sized.

Millennials at work

Millennials at work, from this great article on What Makes a Millennial at The Odyssey online

Read More

3 Valuable Lessons from Classic Rock Musicians on Choosing Training Software

Given the presumptuous title, my readers are probably expecting some hefty, bombastic piece paralleling between stardom and software, or perhaps a note on the importance of substance abuse in the process of getting your users addicted to your software.

 

But the truth is that the most admirable musicians in pop culture, who were able to lead a sustainable, successful career, often offer advice that relates to method driven processes, stability oriented choices and just the right amount of boldness to get you to the front – without going over the edge.

Read More

Video Training’s Twin Problems (and one more)

As 2016 continues to unfold, there seems to be a lot of concern about the future of training. One of the hot topics of discussions is how training should evolve to support the changing needs of the millennials, who are becoming a majority in the work force. One of the hottest trends is video training – short 2 minute videos that are easy to follow and address.

 

Don’t get me wrong – video training is a massive improvement over lengthy text documents and manuals. Training videos epitomize the desire for advanced, creative and dynamic training solutions. For a long time video training was an indication of advanced technological capabilities and superior customer service capacity. They even made poor navigation design and confusing UX forgivable, because there was a way to bridge the experience.

 

But video training comes with a pair of unavoidable twin problems – cost and decay. They are connected in that special way things that cost too much and live a very short life are. That’s the TL;DR. Here’s a breakdown of the problems:

 video twin problems

Read More

Join us at the #Training2016 Test Kitchen

test kitchen

 

 

Attending Training 2016 Conference & Expo in Orlando on the 15th? Come hear our CMO and resident training expert, Oded Ilan, discuss the shift from instructive to supportive employee training in today’s  corporate training landscape.

Oded will be speaking at the Training Technology Test Kitchen hosted by Phylise Banner. If that slot is already booked, contact him about meeting another time during the conference.

 

 

Devise an Employee Onboarding Plan Based on Employee Types

An article published by Cooper-Thomas, Anderson & Cash at the University of Auckland in 2008 prompted consideration of different types of employee onboarding, for different types of employees. The data they used was segmented by new employees’ experience.

 

The article’s premise is simple: experienced newcomers respond differently to onboarding efforts than inexperienced ones. Experienced employees, claims the research, are more inclined to try to shape their work environment rather than passively accept mentoring and initiation input.

Read More
Page 1 of 3123